National Standards and Guidelines

Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools Fact Sheets

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Using the findings of the Institute of Medicine’s Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: Leading the Way toward Healthier Youth report. CDC developed a set of four audience-specific fact sheets as a resource for school board members, administrators, and staff; parents; and youth to use in the support and development of strong nutrition standards for foods outside of the school meal programs. These fact sheets provide recommendations for implementing the Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools report.


School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CDC combined the research and best practices for promoting healthy eating and physical activity in schools into nine guidelines. The guidelines serve as the foundation for developing, implementing, and evaluating school-based healthy eating and physical activity policies and practices for students.


Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: Chapter E: Policies to Promote Healthy Eating

National Association of State Boards of Education

This guide contains recent scientific data, analysis, examples of state and local best practices, and evidence-based model policies that can be adapted by schools, districts, and states. The guides also cover a wide array of topics, such as what makes a quality school meals program, creating a healthy eating environment throughout the school, prevention education, and nutrition-related school services.


Nutrition Standards for School Meals Program

USDA. FNS.

Through the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act championed by the First Lady and signed by President Obama, USDA made the first major changes in school meals in 15 years. View the regulations, supporting documents, and technical assistance materials here.


Smart Snacks in School

USDA. Food and Nutrition Service.

This Web page includes information on the new Smarts Snacks in School nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, as well as summaries, simple handouts, and other technical assistance and guidance materials to help schools offer healthy food and beverage choices.


School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children

Institute of Medicine.

This report details the IOM’s recommendations to USDA on revising the standards and requirements so that school meals are more healthful. These menu planning standards are not all required by federal mandate, but they serve as the gold standard recommendations for the nutrition standards in school meals programs.


Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: Leading the Way Toward Healthier Youth

Institute of Medicine.

This report details the IOM standards for competitive foods and beverages in schools, which are not all required by federal mandate, but they serve as the gold standard recommendations for the availability, sale, and content of competitive foods in schools.


Dietary Guidelines for Americans

USDA. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are the cornerstone of Federal nutrition policy and nutrition education activities. The recommendations are intended for Americans ages 2 years and over, including those at risk for chronic disease.